Top Ten Sports Photography Tips For Beginners (part 2)

5. Watch your ISO

Shutter speed is very important. The correct exposure can be determined with three components, including aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. When shooting in a semi-manual modes like aperture priority or shutter priority, we need to set the ISO based on the location, time, and conditions of the event that you are taking photos. For example, for a bright sunny daytime football match, a low ISO of 400 will be perfect since there is plenty of light available for the camera to use. If it is a dull overcast day and there is not so much light, you need to increase your ISO, usually to around 800-1200.

6. Use Shutter Priority Mode In Case Aperture Priority isn’t available

For non-SLR photographers only having a camera that enables shutter speed settings, shutter priority mode is best used. It is important to remember that you can still capture some great shots without SLR. Most cameras that includes point-and-shoots will enable the users to set a shutter speed. Using this mode enables us to tell the camera directly what speed we’d like the shutter to be without having to tell the camera how much light to let in as we did with aperture priority mode. The camera will decide on what aperture or f/stop number to use. As mentioned before, at least 1/500th of a second is needed. You will need to take test shots as setting your shutter speed manually if you set it too high and not let enough light into the camera.

7. Set camera to continually focus on subjects and use burst mode

If you want the camera to keep up with the fast movements, you need to set it to continually focus on subjects rather than lock on to one spot. You must also set your camera to take multiple images, usually referred to as burst or frames per second. Locate both of these on your camera and make sure that they are switched ON as shooting sports. If you can set how many frames per second you want your camera to take, always set it to the maximum whether it may be 3, 4, 5 or more photos per second. This helps to increase your chances of capturing that money shot.

Top Photography Tips You Need to Master (part 2)

Don’t Use the Pop-Up Flash

Don’t use the pop-up flash since the light that is emitted from the pop-up flash on your camera is intense, harsh, bright, and unnatural.

If you are in a situation with dim lighting, choose another avenue of getting a well-exposed photo. The easiest thing to do may be to increase the ISO because ISO can control the sensitivity of the sensor of your camera to light. Therefore, the higher the ISO is, the more sensitive the camera’s sensor will be.

If you are taking photos at ISO 400 and they are too dark, increase to ISO 800, 1600, 3200, and so on. You will hear an increase in digital noise when you increase the ISO, but a little noise is just a small price to pay for a better exposure.

Another choice is to open the aperture so that the camera’s lens can get more of light. The aperture is the set of blades inside the camera’s lens and its size is measured in f-stops. The f-stop scale features very large apertures such as f/1.4 to a very small apertures such as f/22.

If you are shooting in low light, open up the aperture in order to brighten up the photo.

Of the three exposure settings, including shutter speed, aperture, and ISO, perhaps shutter speed offers the most possibilities regarding creative images. The reason is that you can blur movement with a slow shutter speed or freeze movement with a fast shutter speed.

As slowing the shutter speed, you have all types of options to create a sense of movement in the shot. You can blur the movement of a person when they are walking, running, or dancing, create photos with light trails from passing vehicles, or even shoot photos of the night sky with exaggerated star trails.

All you need is a slow shutter speed, a moving subject, and your camera mounted to a tripod!

Top Photography Tips You Need to Master (part 1)

If you want to take your photography to the next level, this is where you should start! The following tips are some of the cornerstones of great photography. They are simple and straightforward so that you can start using them right now and see improved results.

Eliminate Camera Shake

Camera shake usually occurs when you handhold the camera. It causes blurry photos. The first step is to learn how to hold your camera properly to give it the most stable base possible.

You should use both your hands, including one on the camera grip, another under the camera lens/body. To give your arms additional support, you should tuck your elbows into your chest.

Another tip to prevent camera shake is that the shutter speed you are using must be fast enough to prevent blur. You just need to make sure that the shutter speed is equal to or bigger than the focal length of the lens.

Of course, using a tripod will also help prevent camera shake.

Simple Backgrounds = Better Portraits

If you like portraiture, the fastest and easiest thing you can do is to simplify the background because a portrait aims to highlight the person in the photo, not the background around them.

If the background is too detailed, it will draw the viewer’s attention away from the key person.

So, find simple and non-descript backgrounds that won’t attract attention.

If you find a great spot for a portrait but afraid that the background is too crazy, what you should do is to use a large aperture to help to minimize the depth of field and turn the background into blurry goodness.

In addition, you can blur the background in Photoshop, too.

Tailor the ISO to the Situation

ISO controls the sensitivity of the camera to light, so you need to use the suitable ISO for certain situation.

If you’re shooting in broad daylight, minimizing the ISO is prudent. The reason is that you don’t need to make the sensor more sensitive to light when there’s an abundance of light.

Conversely, when there’s only little light, you should bump up the ISO.