Sports Photography: The Contrast Between Static and Dynamic

Sports photography is not as easy as many people think. For 1: 1 fighting sports, such as fencing, you often want your photos to portray the excitement of the match. In this article, let’s look at how we can do this effectively by using panning techniques to show athletes’ stillness and movement in a single image.

In fencing, it only takes a fraction of a second to determine who wins or loses. Photographers must all want to depict the second in which one athlete is moving and the other is standing still in a single image. When both subjects are moving, to capture both stillness and movement at the same time, your shutter speed should not be too high but not too low.

You need to avoid having both objects become blurred, but I also can’t let both objects “freeze”. Although this may vary depending on the speed of movement of the subject, you may want to change the shutter speed based on their movement speed.

In this case, try to create motion blur from the moving swordsman using a shutter speed of 1/10 second, while swordsmen with smaller movements can be captured clearly at a speed. shutter about 1/2 second.

Another trick is to use the panning technique when shooting. When panning, focus on the standing athlete, instead of tracking the athlete with more movement. Because the standing athlete may still move a bit, the panning must predict and track the athlete’s small movements. In doing so, the athlete who has more movement in the opposite direction of your panning movement will produce a more blurry effect while you focus will still be the athlete standing still.

It is actually possible to find a certain charm in speed and movement in that single swordfight moment. However, there was another way to capture the moment in which the two swordsmen were rivals. It is freezing the entire action with a high shutter speed. Shoot at 1 / 2,000 second. Focus first on one of the swordsmen, then release the shutter when ready.